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"Brooklyn 2010" by Joan Snyder

The works of two abstract painters who are also Jewish New Yorkers are the subjects of solo shows at two Manhattan galleries. The Betty Cunningham Gallery is displaying fifteen paintings by Joan Snyder through October 30, 2010 in an exhibit entitled "A Year in the Painting Life." The gallery is located at 541 W 25th Street between 10th and 11th Avenues in Chelsea and is open Tuesdays through Saturdays from 10:00 AM to 6:00 PM. Readers of this column may recall that Joan Snyder is one of the artists whose work is included in the Jewish Museum's "Shifting The Gaze" exhibit which I described in my September 12, 2010 article.

This exhibition focuses on paintings reminiscent of Snyder’s early stroke paintings of the 1970’s and field paintings of the 1980’s. In her newest paintings Snyder continues to use a variety of media. In "Oh April," a triptych and the largest painting in the show, Snyder uses (in addition to oil and acrylic on linen) burlap, fabric, pastel, dirt, herbs and seeds. In "Ode to B," a memorial to a close friend, red strokes, some appearing to be hearts, drip to the base of the painting, and small ghost-like sail boats traverse the impastoed white surface. Joan Snyder was born in Highland Park, NJ in 1940. She received an AB from Douglass College in 1962 and a MFA from Rutgers University in 1966. She lives and works in Brooklyn and Woodstock, NY. Throughout her career, Snyder has received a host of prestigious awards and honors. Most recently, in 2007, as mentioned above, she was honored as a recipient of The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Fellowship.

Heskin Contemporary is featuring the work of Russell Roberts through December 4, 2010 in an exhibit entitled RUSSELL ROBERTS: POCKETS OF ACCUMULATION includes a new series of oil paintings and a selection of works on paper. The gallery is located at 443 West 37th Street between 9th and 10th Avenues and is open Wednesdays through Saturdays from noon to 6:00 PM. The following is an excerpt from the catalogue adjoining the exhibition written by the artist and writer Jennifer Riley:

Russell Roberts is an accomplished mature abstract artist working in the medium of paint for some time. In his new abstract paintings multiple gestalts and provocative explorations of painting history combine into images that resist easy categorization. Roberts embraces the flexibility and fluidity of the medium of painting for both its literal and metaphorical possibilities.

In a time of widening spectacle, gloss and speed, Roberts exploits the slowness of the mediums liquidity and transparency, its opacity and density. Some works feature line others celebrate form, many juggle or balance both. Using fragments, layers, lines, drips, washes and erasures these works depict a stratified and changing world in which multiple formal differences and often opposing elements conjoin to form new and integrated identities. In his complex structures, he collides organic irregularity with geometric and biomorphic shapes, and articulates stretches of canvas with an expansive range of unpredictable and constantly surprising color.

Mr. Roberts grew up in New York city, graduated from Vassar College, the School of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston and received an MFA from Boston University in 1995. He has been awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship in Painting in 1997, a grant from the Mass Arts Council in 2002 and an Albee Foundation Fellowship in 2006 and 2008, among others. He was the Artist-in-Residence at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill in 2003. He has had one- person exhibitions at Binghamton University, UNC Chapel Hill, Farrell- Pollock Gallery, Boston University and a two- person show at the Painting Center, NY. This is Roberts’ first exhibition at Heskin Contemporary.

For more info: David Cooper

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On Sunday morning September 19, 2010 Dor Chadash will hold a 5 kilometer walk/run in Manhattan's Riverside Park to raise money for Dror Foundation, which hopes  to raise $20,000 to purchase five physical therapy and rehabilitation bicycles for Israeli soldiers with severe leg injuries or paralysis, at a cost of $4,000 each. Read the article on examiner.com for details of this event.



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On Sunday morning September 19, 2010 Dor Chadash will hold a 5 kilometer walk/run in Manhattan's Riverside Park to raise money for Dror Foundation, which hopes  to raise $20,000 to purchase five physical therapy and rehabilitation bicycles for Israeli soldiers with severe leg injuries or paralysis, at a cost of $4,000 each. Read the article on examiner.com for details of this event.

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American Jews for a Just Peace, Jewish Voice for Peace, Jews for Racial and Economic Justice, and Jews Say No! will hold a rally tomorrow evening September 16th 5:30-7:00 PM in front of the Museum of Tolerance, 226 E. 42nd Street, between 2nd and 3rd Avenues in Manhattan to protest that institution's alleged Islamophobia and anti-Arab racism in New York City and elsewhere.

Read the entire article on examiner.com

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American Jews for a Just Peace, Jewish Voice for Peace, Jews for Racial and Economic Justice, and Jews Say No! will hold a rally tomorrow evening September 16th 5:30-7:00 PM in front of the Museum of Tolerance, 226 E. 42nd Street, between 2nd and 3rd Avenues in Manhattan to protest that institution's alleged Islamophobia and anti-Arab racism in New York City and elsewhere.

Read the entire article on examiner.com

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06 Lee Lozano - UntitledUntitled (1962) by Lee Lozano (American, 1930-1999) The Jewish Museum

This Sunday September 12, 2010 Shifting the Gaze: Painting and Feminism, an exhibit that explores the impact of feminism on contemporary North American painting for past half century, will open at TheJewish Museum located at 92nd Street and Fifth Avenue. The exhibit will continue through January 30, 2011. Tuesday morning September 7th your New York Jewish Culture examiner previewed the exhibit, which traverses Abstract Impressionism, Pop, and Minimalism through to the present.

The first image in the exhibit is a representational 1930 self-portrait by a very young Lee Krasner (1908-1984). She portrays herself painting outdoors (there are trees in the background), standing in front of a canvas wearing a blue short sleeve shirt and white overalls, holding paintbrushes and a paint smeared rag or towel. This is followed by Miriam Schapiro‘s 1958 Fanfare, a stunningly strong Abstract Expressionist celebration of color that by itself is worth the price of admission (see the slideshow below even though the photographs do not do the originals justice). In the same room there are other abstract works by Eva Hesse, Joan Snyder, Lousie Nevelson, and Judy Chicago.

The title of the exhibit, Shifting the Gaze, is most apropos in the next room whose theme isPainting the Body. The first painting here is Joan Semmel‘s 1978 Sunlight, which is a riveting nude self-portrait painted from her own point of view looking down at her breasts, belly, pubic hair, and limbs. On the opposite wall is Lee Lozano‘s 1962 Untitled, in which a headless woman’s torso is wearing a breast pendant on a neckless and has two Stars of David in place of her breasts. Hanna Wilke has two works in this section, from 1982-84Venus Pareve, a set of identical nude figurines each painted a different color (this and the Nevelson work are the  only three dimensional works in the exhibit), and 1990 BC Series, a minimalist watercolor self portrait.

There is next a section on Pattern and Decoration to which some women artists were drawn in an effort to reinvigorate previously denigrated women’s work. These works feature embroidery, collage and fan painting. There is a 1979 acrylic and collage fan by the sameMiriam Schapiro whose work we saw in the first room (she abandoned Abstract Expressionism in the 1960s). Joyce Kozloff‘s 1996 Naming II (or Who’s Jewish) is a street grid of New York City with the names of Jewish women artists on each street.

The paintings in the fourth room depict the victimization of women (and men, as in Leon Golub‘s 1972Napalm Man). Two works by Nancy Spero are about the Holocaust. The fifth room features paintings that employ writing or other fugitive symbols including Dana Fankfort‘s 2007 Star of David (Orange), Joan Snyder‘s 1987-88 Study for Morning Requiem with Kaddish, as well as more abstract work such as Louise Fishman’s 1984Tashlich, and Melissa Meyer‘s 1992 Lillith.

The exhibit’s sixth and final room Painting Satire includes Deborah Kass‘ 1993 Andy Warhol inspiredDouble Red Yentl, Split from My Elvis, Audrey Flack‘s 1962 Matzo Meal in which she gives Manishevitz boxes the Warhol soup can treatment, Rosalyn Drexler‘s 1966 portrait of Birmingham sherif Bull Connor and his staff Is It True What they Say About Dixie. Cary Leibowitz‘s 1995 I’m A Jew how ’bout u?!! (which would fit in in the previous room), Dana Schutz‘s 2004 depiction of an eating disorder Devourer, Nicole Eisenman‘s 2010 sardonicSeder, and Amy Sillman‘s 2010Untitled, a painting that combines abstract and figurative elements.

In conjunction with the exhibit there will be gallery talks by artists featured in Shifting the Gaze on October 4, 11, and 18. On the same floor as Shifting the Gaze is Fish Forms an exhibit of Frank Gehry‘s fish shaped lamps which will be on view through October 31, 2011.

ADMISSION
Adults $12
Seniors (65 and over with ID) $10
Students (full-time with valid ID) $7.50
Children (under 12) Free

Free Saturdays* 11:00 am – 5:45 pm

For more info: David Cooper



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This Sunday September 12, 2010 Shifting the Gaze: Painting and Feminism, an exhibit that explores the impact of feminism on contemporary North American painting for past half century, will open at The Jewish Museum located at 92nd Street and Fifth Avenue. The exhibit will continue through January 30, 2011. Tuesday morning your New York Jewish Culture examiner previewed the exhibit, which traverses Abstract Impressionism, Pop, and Minimalism through to the present.


Read the complete article and view the slideshow on examiner.com



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Living In Allen Ginsberg's Old Apartment Is Sort of Like Sleeping With James Franco, Right?

Living In Allen Ginsberg's Old Apartment Is Sort of Like Sleeping With James Franco, Right?

Voice-of-a-generation Allen Ginsberg's former one bedroom E. 12th St. apartment can now be yours for $1700/month. Imagine watching Franco's Howl movie in there! The unit has been newly renovated, but the walls may still reverberate with all those howls. Sigh.

Living In Allen Ginsberg's Old Apartment Is Sort of Like Sleeping With James Franco, Right?


Living In Allen Ginsberg's Old Apartment Is Sort of Like Sleeping With James Franco, Right?

[EV Grieve, via Gothamist]

Send an email to Richard Lawson, the author of this post, at richardl@gawker.com.


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Living In Allen Ginsberg's Old Apartment Is Sort of Like Sleeping With James Franco, Right?

Living In Allen Ginsberg's Old Apartment Is Sort of Like Sleeping With James Franco, Right?

Voice-of-a-generation Allen Ginsberg's former one bedroom E. 12th St. apartment can now be yours for $1700/month. Imagine watching Franco's Howl movie in there! The unit has been newly renovated, but the walls may still reverberate with all those howls. Sigh.

Living In Allen Ginsberg's Old Apartment Is Sort of Like Sleeping With James Franco, Right?


Living In Allen Ginsberg's Old Apartment Is Sort of Like Sleeping With James Franco, Right?

[EV Grieve, via Gothamist]

Send an email to Richard Lawson, the author of this post, at richardl@gawker.com.


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Read the article on examiner.com

"A Film Unfinished first emerged out of my theoretical preoccupation with the notion of the 'archive', and the unique nature of the witnessing it bears." - Yael Hersonski

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"A Film Unfinished first emerged out of my theoretical preoccupation with the notion of the 'archive', and the unique nature of the witnessing it bears." - Yael Hersonski

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The New York International Fringe Festival (FringeNYC), the largest multi-arts festival in North America, with more than 200 companies from all over the world performing for 16 days in more than 20 venues, includes three plays with Jewish characters by Jewish women playwrights. Jew Wish, written and performed by Rachel Evans, opens tomorrow night;Abraham's Daughters, written and produced by Elissa Lerner, opens Sunday; and Two Girls, written and performed by Gabrielle Maisels, opens Thursday evening. Each play will have five performances .

Single Jewish Female seeks audience for a night of revelry, laughs and kvetching! Journey inside Rachel's brain and bedroom as she navigates the world of online dating, while placating her nosy parents, in her elusive hunt for her modern-day mensch. JEW WISH is the hilarious and heartfelt adventure of a single Jewish female on the worldwide web of dating. This one-woman show is a refreshingly honest spiel about the elusive perfect man, the requisite overbearing but lovable parents, and the many missteps of searching for a connection online. If you’ve ever dated online (it’s okay to admit) or dated in general (come on, I see you), or even just “thought” about dating, (that’s you, don’t be shy) this show is for you. ?The show is an hour and a half. VENUE: Players Theatre 115 MacDougal Street (Btw West 3rd Street & Bleecker). Performances: SAT 8/14 - 10:00 PM, SUN 8/15- 6:15 PM, MON 8/16- 10:00 PM, TUE 8/17 - 4:15 PM, FRI 8/20 - 4:45 PM. Advance: $15, At the door: $18.

Confronting a moral crisis that threatens both their newfound independence and their budding friendship, Ranya, Kate and Sarah, college freshmen far from home and family, race headlong on a collision course with the ancient faiths of their births. Abraham’s Daughtersdid not enter this world easily. The idea that was born on a late-night campus bus ride home from a shift working at Duke University’s library navigated through not one, but two departments that had never seen a joint honors project in Religion and Theater Studies. It convinced five separate professors to support and advise the project despite recommendations to the contrary. But by the time the play was completed and given a staged reading in 2008, it had Religion professors thinking about theater and it had Theater professors thinking about religion. Along the way, it won the 2008 Reynolds Price scriptwriting award. The journey didn’t end there. Abraham’s Daughters traveled across an ocean and three continents to a dorm room in Doha, Qatar, where details and experiences about Islam and inter-religious dialogue further colored the play. It made its way to Be’er Sheva, Israel, where religion, culture and identity were thrown into even starker contrasts. And after traveling the world, it’s finally time for its New York debut. This is Abraham’s Daughters, and this is about you, or your sister, or your daughter, or your niece, or your best friend, and what they might have done in their freshman year of college. This is the story of three young women leaving home, and trying to find a new one. This is about the unavoidable and unexpected ways that religion affects our decision-making. This is about life. The play is an hour and a half. VENUE: The SoHo Playhouse, 15 Vandam Street (6th Avenue & Varick / 7th Avenue). Performances: Sunday 8.15 @ 7:15 pm, Tuesday 8.17 @ 5:45 pm, Saturday 8.21 @ 4:45 pm, Wednesday 8.25 @ 9:45 pm, Saturday 8.28 @ 6:00 pm, Advance: $15, At the door: $18.

TWO GIRLS: A friendship blossoms and struggles in the "new" South Africa. Two girls, one black, one Jewish, take on the trauma that apartheid left behind. From the granddaughter of Advocate Isie Maisels, successful defender of Nelson Mandela in the "Treason Trial" of 1958. The stage comes alive with Gabrielle Maisels' remarkable portrayal of two girls, Lindiwe, black,and Corinne, Jewish, struggling against injustice, determined to see change, not just forthemselves, but for their country. As with the stories of Anne Frank, and child soldier IshmaelBeah, we see both trauma and fierce hope through the eyes of children. As the miracle of the first democratic election in 1994 gives way to political reality, the New South Africa dawns…and each girl must renew her fight for the dream that she envisioned. Venue: Connelly Theatre, 220 East 4th Street (between Avenues A & B). Performances: Thu August 19 7:00 pm, Sat August 21 3:15 pm, Sun August 22 2:00 pm,Tue August 24 10:15 pm, Wed August 25 4:00 pm. Advance: $15, At the door: $18.




This article first appeared in the late examiner.com




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The New York International Fringe Festival (FringeNYC), the largest multi-arts festival in North America, with more than 200 companies from all over the world performing for 16 days in more than 20 venues, includes three plays with Jewish characters by Jewish women playwrights. Jew Wish, written and performed by Rachel Evans, opens tomorrow night; Abraham's Daughters, written and produced by Elissa Lerner, opens Sunday; and Two Girls, written and performed by Gabrielle Maisels, opens Thursday evening. Each play will have five performances .


 


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Above: Jew Wish playwright and performer Rachel Evans



Above: Gabrielle Maisels in Two Girls.







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Yesterday was Tisha B'Av, the saddest day in the Jewish calendar. But six days after Tisha B'Av we celebrate Tu B'Av, the Jewish love holiday. Although the holiday starts Sunday evening July 25th and ends Monday night July 26th, two Tu B'Av parties will be held on Tuesday night July 27, 2010, one in Brooklyn and another in Manhattan.

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Yesterday was Tisha B'Av, the saddest day in the Jewish calendar. But six days after Tisha B'Av we celebrate Tu B'Av, the Jewish love holiday. Although the holiday starts Sunday evening July 25th and ends Monday night July 26th, two Tu B'Av parties will be held on Tuesday night July 27, 2010, one in Brooklyn and another in Manhattan.

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Every year Poets House holds an exhibit of all the poetry books published in the previous year which visitors can browse and examine. This year the annual Poetry Showcase continues all this month, and a series of readings will be held in which all the poets reading have had books published in the past year. Some of these poets are Jewish, and some of their poems reflect a Jewish sensibility. Estha Weiner, who will read her work Thursday evening July 15, was a classmate of your NY Jewish Culture examiner when he was a creative writing graduate student and is the author of The Mistress Manuscript (Book Works, 2009) and Transfiguration Begins At Home (Tiger Bark Press, 2009). I first brought Rachel Levitsky to my readers attention in a long April events list article. She is the author of Neighbor (Ugly Duckling Press, 2009) and will read at Poets House a week from Thursday, July 22. Admission to the exhibit and the readings is free.

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