davidfcooper: (headshot 01/18/07)
bockbrownbookcoverscropped



"At first glance two historical novels published last week have little in common. Where Charles Bock’s second novel Alice and Oliver is a starkly realistic and unflinching portrait of a marriage undergoing trial by health crisis in 1990s New York, Jennifer S. Brown’s debut novel Modern Girls, on the other hand, is a warm, heimisheh tale of two generations of women in a Jewish immigrant family on Manhattan’s Lower East Side in the 1930s whose opportunities and choices were limited by their gender." -- from my 4/13/16 examiner article. Also see my reviews of the two books in New York Journal of Books .
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Study of young American adults suggests a healthy psychological outlook boosts sexual satisfaction. Empathic people of both genders reach orgasm more frequently, and people with high self-esteem are more likely to enjoy performing oral sex. 
via consumer.healthday.com 
See also: http://goo.gl/6493V

 

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Read the article on hsc.unt.edu

HDL (Good Cholesterol) is not only good for one's heart, it can also help kill cancer cells.

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This is an update to two separate posts from last spring about my prostate cancer. Despite PSA scores that continued to be lower than the one that lead to the previous biopsies, my most recent biopsy revealed two additional tumors that like the first one are also 6 on the Gleason scale. The tumors are small, but since there are more of them it might be wise to consider treatment. My cancer is still stage one, and since I'm also slim I might be a candidate for nerve sparing robotic surgery (for which only stage one patients with BMIs of <25 whose tumors are not on the surface of the prostate qualify) from which odds are excellent that I would recover with full control of my bladder (after 3-6 months of post-operative incontinence) and no loss of sexual potency (though it will take between 6-12 months post-surgery to get that part of my anatomy working to its current capability). I'll have an MRI at the end of the month to determine whether any of the three tumors are on the surface of my prostate; if none of them are I'll have the surgery in early February. 

 

If on the other hand the MRI reveals a surface location of any of the tumors I'll revert to active surveillance in the short run and consider other treatments in the intermediate run, including some that look promising but will not be available for a few years. Since I'm stage one there is no urgency to beginning treatment. I'm only considering surgery now because robotic surgery has excellent outcomes for stage one patients, especially younger sexually virile patients with no prior history of incontinence (the average age of patients is 65--nine years older than me). Meanwhile I'm keeping a positive attitude and increasing my exercise regimen to prepare for surgery should my MRI allow me to proceed.

 

Posted via email from davidfcooper's posterous

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An Israeli discovery allowing stem cells to be cultivated in quantities ample enough to meet the world's needs means that stem cell therapy could soon be within the reach of millions.

Hadassah-Hospital-Jerusalem
Photo courtesy of Yossi Zamir/Flash90.
Mass-market manufacture of stem cells is closer than ever after a breakthrough by researchers from Hadassah University Medical Center in Jerusalem.

To read the article click here

Posted via email from davidfcooper's posterous

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An Israeli discovery allowing stem cells to be cultivated in quantities ample enough to meet the world's needs means that stem cell therapy could soon be within the reach of millions.

Hadassah-Hospital-Jerusalem
Photo courtesy of Yossi Zamir/Flash90.
Mass-market manufacture of stem cells is closer than ever after a breakthrough by researchers from Hadassah University Medical Center in Jerusalem.

To read the article click here

Posted via email from davidfcooper's posterous

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The supplements I've been taking and dietary changes I've made in recent months seem to have made a difference. In December 2009 my PSA result was 3.27. This week it was 1.26! I'll see my urologist a week from Tuesday. Let's see if I can't shrink my prostate tumor and put the cancer into remission. 

Posted via email from davidfcooper's posterous

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The supplements I've been taking and dietary changes I've made in recent months seem to have made a difference. In December 2009 my PSA result was 3.27. This week it was 1.26! I'll see my urologist a week from Tuesday. Let's see if I can't shrink my prostate tumor and put the cancer into remission. 

Posted via email from davidfcooper's posterous

davidfcooper: (Default)

This is a follow-up to my January and February posts. In January I reported that an increase in my PSA would necessitate a prostate biopsy and in February I reported that the biopsy was inconclusive and would require another biopsy in April. In March at the suggestion of our friend [livejournal.com profile] rabjeff, who has been living with prostate cancer for several years, I had a 3-D Doppler ultrasound of my prostate taken by the only radiologist in North America who does them. The radiologist told me I had a non-active prostate cancer of insignificant size and suggested I adopt a strategy of watchful waiting/active surveillance including eliminating dairy from my current pescetarian diet, taking nutritional supplements that are beneficial to the prostate and having the 3-D Doppler ultrasound again in six months. There are treatments for small prostate cancers, however, that can target the tumor in a way that does not impair the entire gland, have fewer side effects than treatments that might be required later if the tumor grows larger, and unlike those other treatments can be repeated should other tumors develop. But to have the option of such targeted treatments required I undergo the second biopsy scheduled for April. The radiologist advised against the biopsy warning that biopsies can actually spread cancer. My urologist said that the radiologist was mistaken and probably basing his opinion on outdated research (the urologist also expressed the opinion that the reason no other radiologist uses 3-D Doppler imaging of the prostate is that it is inaccurate). My own on-line research on biopsies indicates that if the cancer is as small and inactive as the radiologist said it is then it could not survive outside the host organ. Thus having the biopsy posed little risk and would give me more options. 

 

The January prostate biopsy took 12 samples; the April biopsy took 14 samples and was more painful than the first one both during the biopsy and in the weeks since. Only one of the 14 tissue samples had cancer, cancer was found in only 5% of that one sample, and the cancer cells in question are moderate (3 on a scale of 5) and not lethal. Three other tissue samples showed pre-cancerous growths. Prostate cancers are measured on the Gleason Scale (2-10): anything under 7 is considered favorable and non-lethal, and my Gleason score is 6. By and large my April biopsy confirmed the radiologist's scan the previous month, but it also gave me additional information. My Gleason 6 makes me a candidate for what is known as a male lumpectomy (targeting part of the prostate instead of the entire gland). The method that most accurately targets the tumor with the fewest side effects, High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU), is available abroad (for about $20K in Toronto) but is not yet FDA approved. If my prostate gland were a bit smaller (25 mm or less) than it is (32mm) my urologist could get me into a local HIFU clinical trial. Another form of male lumpectomy is Partial Cryosurgery (freezing half the prostate and leaving the other half intact), but that would destroy one of the two nerves responsible for sexual function. So I decided I will adopt a strategy of active surveillance which includes PSA tests every three months, biopsies every six months, following the no animal fat diet mentioned above, and continuing to take meds and nutritional supplements that may shrink my prostate sufficiently to qualify me for a HIFU clinical trial or in a best case scenario may shrink the tumor itself so that treatment other than continuing active surveillance becomes unnecessary. Active surveillance can continue for decades and has no side effects. I prefer giving up dairy cheese and ice cream and enduring the biopsies to over-treating an as yet non-lethal condition.

Posted via web from davidfcooper's posterous

davidfcooper: (Default)

This is a follow-up to my January and February posts. In January I reported that an increase in my PSA would necessitate a prostate biopsy and in February I reported that the biopsy was inconclusive and would require another biopsy in April. In March at the suggestion of our friend [livejournal.com profile] rabjeff, who has been living with prostate cancer for several years, I had a 3-D Doppler ultrasound of my prostate taken by the only radiologist in North America who does them. The radiologist told me I had a non-active prostate cancer of insignificant size and suggested I adopt a strategy of watchful waiting/active surveillance including eliminating dairy from my current pescetarian diet, taking nutritional supplements that are beneficial to the prostate and having the 3-D Doppler ultrasound again in six months. There are treatments for small prostate cancers, however, that can target the tumor in a way that does not impair the entire gland, have fewer side effects than treatments that might be required later if the tumor grows larger, and unlike those other treatments can be repeated should other tumors develop. But to have the option of such targeted treatments required I undergo the second biopsy scheduled for April. The radiologist advised against the biopsy warning that biopsies can actually spread cancer. My urologist said that the radiologist was mistaken and probably basing his opinion on outdated research (the urologist also expressed the opinion that the reason no other radiologist uses 3-D Doppler imaging of the prostate is that it is inaccurate). My own on-line research on biopsies indicates that if the cancer is as small and inactive as the radiologist said it is then it could not survive outside the host organ. Thus having the biopsy posed little risk and would give me more options. 

 

The January prostate biopsy took 12 samples; the April biopsy took 14 samples and was more painful than the first one both during the biopsy and in the weeks since. Only one of the 14 tissue samples had cancer, cancer was found in only 5% of that one sample, and the cancer cells in question are moderate (3 on a scale of 5) and not lethal. Three other tissue samples showed pre-cancerous growths. Prostate cancers are measured on the Gleason Scale (2-10): anything under 7 is considered favorable and non-lethal, and my Gleason score is 6. By and large my April biopsy confirmed the radiologist's scan the previous month, but it also gave me additional information. My Gleason 6 makes me a candidate for what is known as a male lumpectomy (targeting part of the prostate instead of the entire gland). The method that most accurately targets the tumor with the fewest side effects, High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU), is available abroad (for about $20K in Toronto) but is not yet FDA approved. If my prostate gland were a bit smaller (25 mm or less) than it is (32mm) my urologist could get me into a local HIFU clinical trial. Another form of male lumpectomy is Partial Cryosurgery (freezing half the prostate and leaving the other half intact), but that would destroy one of the two nerves responsible for sexual function. So I decided I will adopt a strategy of active surveillance which includes PSA tests every three months, biopsies every six months, following the no animal fat diet mentioned above, and continuing to take meds and nutritional supplements that may shrink my prostate sufficiently to qualify me for a HIFU clinical trial or in a best case scenario may shrink the tumor itself so that treatment other than continuing active surveillance becomes unnecessary. Active surveillance can continue for decades and has no side effects. I prefer giving up dairy cheese and ice cream and enduring the biopsies to over-treating an as yet non-lethal condition.

Posted via web from davidfcooper's posterous

davidfcooper: (Default)

It was not fun, but was necessary. The doc must have taken seven or eight tissue samples, and I could feel each incision. Afterward I felt weak and light headed but was able to walk home; on the way I stopped at the Park Slope Sweet Melissa Patisserie on Seventh Avenue and got a chocolate chip cookie (very rich and very sweet) to raise my diminished blood sugar level. I should get the results of the biopsy in a week. The ultrasound showed calcium deposits which would be the likely explanation for my elevated PSA should the results turn out to be negative. It would also confirm my hunch that I should switch from dairy to soy milk/yogurt.

Posted via web from davidfcooper's posterous

davidfcooper: (Default)

It was not fun, but was necessary. The doc must have taken seven or eight tissue samples, and I could feel each incision. Afterward I felt weak and light headed but was able to walk home; on the way I stopped at the Park Slope Sweet Melissa Patisserie on Seventh Avenue and got a chocolate chip cookie (very rich and very sweet) to raise my diminished blood sugar level. I should get the results of the biopsy in a week. The ultrasound showed calcium deposits which would be the likely explanation for my elevated PSA should the results turn out to be negative. It would also confirm my hunch that I should switch from dairy to soy milk/yogurt.

Posted via web from davidfcooper's posterous

davidfcooper: (Default)

dfcPSAresults012001-122009

I wonder what the good doc will say (my previous urologist closed his practice, so I'll be meeting the new one for the first time). My dad is a prostate cancer survivor which increases my risk for the disease. I'm 55; my dad was 62 at the time of his diagnosis. I'm hoping nutritional adjustments might defer this ailment, but it feels like my remaining years of sexual health have a sword of Damocles suspended above them.

Posted via web from davidfcooper's posterous

davidfcooper: (Default)

dfcPSAresults012001-122009

I wonder what the good doc will say (my previous urologist closed his practice, so I'll be meeting the new one for the first time). My dad is a prostate cancer survivor which increases my risk for the disease. I'm 55; my dad was 62 at the time of his diagnosis. I'm hoping nutritional adjustments might defer this ailment, but it feels like my remaining years of sexual health have a sword of Damocles suspended above them.

Posted via web from davidfcooper's posterous

davidfcooper: (Default)

A relatively low birth weight and early-age weight gain may increase the likelihood of early puberty, hint findings from a German study. Earlier onset of puberty has been linked to certain cancers, high blood sugar and obesity.

I reached puberty relatively late. Overall the onset age of puberty in the USA is trending younger.

Posted via web from davidfcooper's posterous

davidfcooper: (Default)

A relatively low birth weight and early-age weight gain may increase the likelihood of early puberty, hint findings from a German study. Earlier onset of puberty has been linked to certain cancers, high blood sugar and obesity.

I reached puberty relatively late. Overall the onset age of puberty in the USA is trending younger.

Posted via web from davidfcooper's posterous

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