davidfcooper: (headshot 01/18/07)

bookofnumbersbookcover


What happens when a down on his luck luddite novelist is hired to ghostwrite a memoir by a math whiz tech mogul who shares his (and the author of this novel’s) name? ...At close to 600 pages of dense prose Book of Numbers is not light reading. I close my NYJB review by recommending it to “readers as ambitious as it is.” -- from Jewish books: Joshua Cohen's Book of Numbers is a high tech epic Also see my New York Journal of Books review. A challenging but fun and rewarding read!
davidfcooper: (headshot 01/18/07)

What does fiction about art forgery have to do with Jewish identity?

In my New York Journal of Books review I praise Perec’s first novel as “a fully realized and mature work of fiction.” For a fuller discussion of Portrait of a Man Known as Il Condottiere read my New York Journal of Books review












Portrait of a Man (The Condottiero) by Antonello da Messina (1475,Venice, Italy), Musée du Louvre, Paris, France
davidfcooper: (Default)

"To become memorable or brilliant, language needs to be fertilized by egotism." 

Adam Kirsch's long but worth reading collection of meditations/prose epigrams on the position of writers WRT past writers, future readers, and the present tense; on the respective roles of literature and science; and the role of culture in a technologically evolving civilization (among other insights). 

via poetryfoundation.org

Posted via email from davidfcooper's posterous

davidfcooper: (headshot 01/18/07)

Now that another secular calendar year is beginning I would like to share my recommendations of Jewish fiction and poetry books published last year. This is not a "best of" list, merely a list of Jewish themed books published in 2010 that I have actually read and reviewed at my other writing gig as a book reviewer at New York Journal of Books.

Bookmark and Share

davidfcooper: (Default)

 

Art works in Tabla Rasa's ongoing exhibits in the front of the gallery are more expensive, but after viewing those exhibits continue to the backroom (where art works are stored and packed for shipping and the gallery owners have their office) for an art sale in which all art works have prices no greater than $400. 

 

View the slideshow and read the entire article on examiner.com

Bookmark and Share

 

Posted via email from davidfcooper's posterous

davidfcooper: (Default)

 

In "A Hanukkah Project: Daniel Libeskind's Line of Fire"  40 hanukkiot (Hanukkah menorahs) selected by curator Susan Braunstein from The Jewish Museum's permanent collection of over 500 hanukkiot are displayed on a stand designed by architect Daniel Libeskind.


Read the entire article and view a slideshow of the exhibited hanukkiot.


Bookmark and Share

 

Posted via email from davidfcooper's posterous

davidfcooper: (Default)

New works by two young Jewish women dramatists will be performed at separate and unrelated Manhattan venues Thursday night November 11, 2010. Read more on examiner.com

Bookmark and Share

 

Posted via email from davidfcooper's posterous

davidfcooper: (headshot 01/18/07)

Jewish Museum 10/29/10-03/27/11: Houdini Art and Magic part 2 - New York NY | Examiner.com



Joe Coleman, The Man Who Walked Through Walls (Harry Houdini), 1995, acrylic on masonite.
Collection of David and Rhonda Denholtz

davidfcooper: (headshot 01/18/07)

On Friday October 29, 2010 The Jewish Museum will present Houdini: Art and Magic, the first major art museum exhibition to examine the life, legend and enduring cultural influence of Harry Houdini. The exhibit will explore the career and lasting impact of the magician, escape artist, vaudeville entertainer, silent movie actor, author and lecturer through 163 objects including 26 recent works of art inspired by Houdini. The exhibit, which will appeal to both children and adults, will remain at The Jewish Museum through March 27, 2011, after which it will travel to Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Madison, Wisconsin.

Houdini was born Ehrich Weiss in cosmopolitan Budapest, Hungary, in 1874, and emigrated with his parents in 1878 to rural Appleton, WI where his father, a rabbi, was hired by the local Reform synagogue. After several years the congregation decided they wanted a native born rabbi whose English was more fluent, and the family moved to New York where as an avid runner, swimmer and boxer Weiss developed the training regimen that would prepare him for the rigorous physical feats he would later perform as an escape artist.

Weiss began his career as a magician after his father's death in 1892, initially performing card tricks. He chose the name Harry Houdini in honor of the French magician Jean Eugene Robert-Houdin; his family affectionately nicknamed him "Ehree" which became Harry. Houdini married Bess Rahner, a Coney Island song and dance performer who became his stage partner. One of their first acts was the "Metamorphosis" where Bess was locked in a trunk and in a matter of three seconds she and Houdini would trade places. In another trick he would apparently swallow several needles and a yard of thread and then pull the tread from his mouth with the needles threaded on it.

But his greatest fame came from his ability to free himself from handcuffs, ropes, or straightjackets sometimes dangling from a suspended rope or immersed in a tank of water. In a press conference during a press preview of the exhibit on Monday guest curatorBrooke Kamin Rapaport pointed out that Houdini was one of fourteen million Europeans who immigrated to the United States in the final four decades of the nineteenth century in search of personal, religious, political and economic freedom and who responded viscerally to his courageous acts of self-liberation. At the same press conference magician David Blaine said that he feels most alive, that his senses are most acute and colors are more vivid, when he places himself in danger as did Houdini before him. To be continued...

The Jewish Museum's Shifting The Gaze: Painting and Feminism exhibit that I discussed in my September 12, 2010 article continues until January 30, 2011. If you haven't seen it take time to do so when you come for the Houdini show.

Museum hours are Saturdays, Sundays, Mondays and Tuesdays 11:00 AM to 5:45 PM; Thursdays 11:00 AM to 8:00 PM; and Fridays 11:00 AM to 4:00 PM. Admission is $12 for adults, $10 for senior citizens, $7.50 for students, and free for children under 12 and for Jewish Museum members. Admission is free on Saturdays. The Jewish Museum is located on the northeast corner of Fifth Avenue and 92nd Street in Manhattan.

davidfcooper: (headshot 01/18/07)

"Brooklyn 2010" by Joan Snyder

The works of two abstract painters who are also Jewish New Yorkers are the subjects of solo shows at two Manhattan galleries. The Betty Cunningham Gallery is displaying fifteen paintings by Joan Snyder through October 30, 2010 in an exhibit entitled "A Year in the Painting Life." The gallery is located at 541 W 25th Street between 10th and 11th Avenues in Chelsea and is open Tuesdays through Saturdays from 10:00 AM to 6:00 PM. Readers of this column may recall that Joan Snyder is one of the artists whose work is included in the Jewish Museum's "Shifting The Gaze" exhibit which I described in my September 12, 2010 article.

This exhibition focuses on paintings reminiscent of Snyder’s early stroke paintings of the 1970’s and field paintings of the 1980’s. In her newest paintings Snyder continues to use a variety of media. In "Oh April," a triptych and the largest painting in the show, Snyder uses (in addition to oil and acrylic on linen) burlap, fabric, pastel, dirt, herbs and seeds. In "Ode to B," a memorial to a close friend, red strokes, some appearing to be hearts, drip to the base of the painting, and small ghost-like sail boats traverse the impastoed white surface. Joan Snyder was born in Highland Park, NJ in 1940. She received an AB from Douglass College in 1962 and a MFA from Rutgers University in 1966. She lives and works in Brooklyn and Woodstock, NY. Throughout her career, Snyder has received a host of prestigious awards and honors. Most recently, in 2007, as mentioned above, she was honored as a recipient of The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Fellowship.

Heskin Contemporary is featuring the work of Russell Roberts through December 4, 2010 in an exhibit entitled RUSSELL ROBERTS: POCKETS OF ACCUMULATION includes a new series of oil paintings and a selection of works on paper. The gallery is located at 443 West 37th Street between 9th and 10th Avenues and is open Wednesdays through Saturdays from noon to 6:00 PM. The following is an excerpt from the catalogue adjoining the exhibition written by the artist and writer Jennifer Riley:

Russell Roberts is an accomplished mature abstract artist working in the medium of paint for some time. In his new abstract paintings multiple gestalts and provocative explorations of painting history combine into images that resist easy categorization. Roberts embraces the flexibility and fluidity of the medium of painting for both its literal and metaphorical possibilities.

In a time of widening spectacle, gloss and speed, Roberts exploits the slowness of the mediums liquidity and transparency, its opacity and density. Some works feature line others celebrate form, many juggle or balance both. Using fragments, layers, lines, drips, washes and erasures these works depict a stratified and changing world in which multiple formal differences and often opposing elements conjoin to form new and integrated identities. In his complex structures, he collides organic irregularity with geometric and biomorphic shapes, and articulates stretches of canvas with an expansive range of unpredictable and constantly surprising color.

Mr. Roberts grew up in New York city, graduated from Vassar College, the School of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston and received an MFA from Boston University in 1995. He has been awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship in Painting in 1997, a grant from the Mass Arts Council in 2002 and an Albee Foundation Fellowship in 2006 and 2008, among others. He was the Artist-in-Residence at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill in 2003. He has had one- person exhibitions at Binghamton University, UNC Chapel Hill, Farrell- Pollock Gallery, Boston University and a two- person show at the Painting Center, NY. This is Roberts’ first exhibition at Heskin Contemporary.

For more info: David Cooper

davidfcooper: (Default)

 

Poet, novelist, essayist, translator, and scholar of Hebrew and Jewish literature of the Middle East Ammiel Alcalay will give a reading this Saturday afternoon October 16, 2010  from 1:00 to 3:00 PM at the Bowery Poetry Club located at 308 Bowery between Bleeker and Houston across the street from CBGBs.  


Read the entire article on examiner.com

 

Posted via email from davidfcooper's posterous

davidfcooper: (headshot 01/18/07)

06 Lee Lozano - UntitledUntitled (1962) by Lee Lozano (American, 1930-1999) The Jewish Museum

This Sunday September 12, 2010 Shifting the Gaze: Painting and Feminism, an exhibit that explores the impact of feminism on contemporary North American painting for past half century, will open at TheJewish Museum located at 92nd Street and Fifth Avenue. The exhibit will continue through January 30, 2011. Tuesday morning September 7th your New York Jewish Culture examiner previewed the exhibit, which traverses Abstract Impressionism, Pop, and Minimalism through to the present.

The first image in the exhibit is a representational 1930 self-portrait by a very young Lee Krasner (1908-1984). She portrays herself painting outdoors (there are trees in the background), standing in front of a canvas wearing a blue short sleeve shirt and white overalls, holding paintbrushes and a paint smeared rag or towel. This is followed by Miriam Schapiro‘s 1958 Fanfare, a stunningly strong Abstract Expressionist celebration of color that by itself is worth the price of admission (see the slideshow below even though the photographs do not do the originals justice). In the same room there are other abstract works by Eva Hesse, Joan Snyder, Lousie Nevelson, and Judy Chicago.

The title of the exhibit, Shifting the Gaze, is most apropos in the next room whose theme isPainting the Body. The first painting here is Joan Semmel‘s 1978 Sunlight, which is a riveting nude self-portrait painted from her own point of view looking down at her breasts, belly, pubic hair, and limbs. On the opposite wall is Lee Lozano‘s 1962 Untitled, in which a headless woman’s torso is wearing a breast pendant on a neckless and has two Stars of David in place of her breasts. Hanna Wilke has two works in this section, from 1982-84Venus Pareve, a set of identical nude figurines each painted a different color (this and the Nevelson work are the  only three dimensional works in the exhibit), and 1990 BC Series, a minimalist watercolor self portrait.

There is next a section on Pattern and Decoration to which some women artists were drawn in an effort to reinvigorate previously denigrated women’s work. These works feature embroidery, collage and fan painting. There is a 1979 acrylic and collage fan by the sameMiriam Schapiro whose work we saw in the first room (she abandoned Abstract Expressionism in the 1960s). Joyce Kozloff‘s 1996 Naming II (or Who’s Jewish) is a street grid of New York City with the names of Jewish women artists on each street.

The paintings in the fourth room depict the victimization of women (and men, as in Leon Golub‘s 1972Napalm Man). Two works by Nancy Spero are about the Holocaust. The fifth room features paintings that employ writing or other fugitive symbols including Dana Fankfort‘s 2007 Star of David (Orange), Joan Snyder‘s 1987-88 Study for Morning Requiem with Kaddish, as well as more abstract work such as Louise Fishman’s 1984Tashlich, and Melissa Meyer‘s 1992 Lillith.

The exhibit’s sixth and final room Painting Satire includes Deborah Kass‘ 1993 Andy Warhol inspiredDouble Red Yentl, Split from My Elvis, Audrey Flack‘s 1962 Matzo Meal in which she gives Manishevitz boxes the Warhol soup can treatment, Rosalyn Drexler‘s 1966 portrait of Birmingham sherif Bull Connor and his staff Is It True What they Say About Dixie. Cary Leibowitz‘s 1995 I’m A Jew how ’bout u?!! (which would fit in in the previous room), Dana Schutz‘s 2004 depiction of an eating disorder Devourer, Nicole Eisenman‘s 2010 sardonicSeder, and Amy Sillman‘s 2010Untitled, a painting that combines abstract and figurative elements.

In conjunction with the exhibit there will be gallery talks by artists featured in Shifting the Gaze on October 4, 11, and 18. On the same floor as Shifting the Gaze is Fish Forms an exhibit of Frank Gehry‘s fish shaped lamps which will be on view through October 31, 2011.

ADMISSION
Adults $12
Seniors (65 and over with ID) $10
Students (full-time with valid ID) $7.50
Children (under 12) Free

Free Saturdays* 11:00 am – 5:45 pm

For more info: David Cooper



Bookmark and Share


davidfcooper: (Default)


This Sunday September 12, 2010 Shifting the Gaze: Painting and Feminism, an exhibit that explores the impact of feminism on contemporary North American painting for past half century, will open at The Jewish Museum located at 92nd Street and Fifth Avenue. The exhibit will continue through January 30, 2011. Tuesday morning your New York Jewish Culture examiner previewed the exhibit, which traverses Abstract Impressionism, Pop, and Minimalism through to the present.


Read the complete article and view the slideshow on examiner.com



Bookmark and Share


 

davidfcooper: (Default)

Every year Poets House holds an exhibit of all the poetry books published in the previous year which visitors can browse and examine. This year the annual Poetry Showcase continues all this month, and a series of readings will be held in which all the poets reading have had books published in the past year. Some of these poets are Jewish, and some of their poems reflect a Jewish sensibility. Estha Weiner, who will read her work Thursday evening July 15, was a classmate of your NY Jewish Culture examiner when he was a creative writing graduate student and is the author of The Mistress Manuscript (Book Works, 2009) and Transfiguration Begins At Home (Tiger Bark Press, 2009). I first brought Rachel Levitsky to my readers attention in a long April events list article. She is the author of Neighbor (Ugly Duckling Press, 2009) and will read at Poets House a week from Thursday, July 22. Admission to the exhibit and the readings is free.

Posted via email from davidfcooper's posterous

Bookmark and Share

davidfcooper: (Default)

Every year Poets House holds an exhibit of all the poetry books published in the previous year which visitors can browse and examine. This year the annual Poetry Showcase continues all this month, and a series of readings will be held in which all the poets reading have had books published in the past year. Some of these poets are Jewish, and some of their poems reflect a Jewish sensibility. Estha Weiner, who will read her work Thursday evening July 15, was a classmate of your NY Jewish Culture examiner when he was a creative writing graduate student and is the author of The Mistress Manuscript (Book Works, 2009) and Transfiguration Begins At Home (Tiger Bark Press, 2009). I first brought Rachel Levitsky to my readers attention in a long April events list article. She is the author of Neighbor (Ugly Duckling Press, 2009) and will read at Poets House a week from Thursday, July 22. Admission to the exhibit and the readings is free.

Posted via email from davidfcooper's posterous

Bookmark and Share

Profile

davidfcooper: (Default)
davidfcooper

July 2017

S M T W T F S
      1
2345678
910 1112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031     

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Jul. 25th, 2017 08:44 am
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios